Postcards from Savannah, Part I

Following up on my previous post about Savannah’s culinary delights, I thought I would share some snaps from my first visit to (arguably) Georgia’s most charming city in October 2019. Savannah is an extremely walkable city, and with 22 squares, an extensive historic district, and a vibrant riverside scene in what were once shipping warehouses, there is plenty to see by foot. Here’s some of it!

Savannah’s Squares

Historically, Savannah was laid out in a grid system (dubbed the Oglethorpe plan after the man -and founder of the colony of Georgia- who devised it) featuring 24 park-like squares, 22 of which still exist today. These squares divide up the historic areas of the city into smaller communities, giving the neighbourhoods around each square the feeling of being its own small town within a larger metropolitan area.

Chippewa Square (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
Chippewa Square (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
Statue of James Oglethorpe, Chippewa Square (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
Chippewa Square (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)

River Street

Once a rough haunt of sailors and other unsavoury types of men, River Street has transformed into a booming (and bougie) dining and shopping area. Many businesses now take up residence in old shipping warehouses built along the Savannah River, an important feature of the city since its founding in 1733. The town’s trolley tracks also run alongside the docks- keep out of its way when you hear the bell!

River Street (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
Shipbuilding warehouse on River Street (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
River Street (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
River Street (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
The old wall and cobblestones of River Street (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)

Forsyth Park

Forsyth Park, first developed in the mid-1800s, is a natural gathering place in Savannah. With broad walkways stretching over ten acres of land and a delicate fountain framed by trees draped in Spanish moss, it’s the perfect place for a stroll, a picnic, or a good old-fashioned people-watching session.

Forsyth Park (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
Forsyth Park (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)

Jones Street

Jones Street features gorgeous historic homes set on wide, cobbled thoroughfares lined by old trees covered in swaying Spanish moss. It’s lovely to wander this gorgeous street and imagine which house you might love if you were a millionaire…

Jones Street (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
Jones Street (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
Jones Street (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
Jones Street (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
Jones Street (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)

Savannah City Market

City Market is a hotspot for visitors and locals alike on any night of the week. A pedestrian road lined on both sides by restaurants, bars, art galleries, and boutiques, City Market was first constructed in 1755 (although fires periodically razed it to the ground, necessitating rebuilding). It’s a thriving, vibrant area for nightlife. Don’t be surprised to see people of all ages out on a warm evening; there’s live music, ice cream for the children and cocktails for the adults, a Prohibition Museum, and plenty of benches for sitting- truly, something for everyone!

City Market (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
City Market (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
City Market (photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)

What is your favourite spot in Savannah?Β Let me know- I’ll be back in April 2020 and I’d love to see!

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