Sunny Soller

Soller was our last day trip during our time in Mallorca. Whenever I think of it now, I immediately recall the heady scent of lemon and orange blossoms in the air.

(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)

Perched in the mountains, the town of Soller is anchored by its cathedral in its central square, the Plaça Constitució. This lovely, sunny heart of the town pulses with activity, as people relax in outdoor seating among the bistros and cafes, cool down by the fountain in front of the cathedral, or line up to take the famous tram down to the Port de Soller.

(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)

It is a hub of activity, and charming alleys branch from it like spokes from a wheel. Down these streets, too narrow for a car to pass through, find shopfronts selling everything from woven straw bags to perfumes that capture the essence of Soller to fresh produce brought in from local orchards and fields.

(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)

Then there is the Port de Soller. An old-fashioned tram takes you down from the town of Soller to the port, through groves of lemons and olives, but be prepared to wait and then possibly to be crowded on the much-in-demand cable car.

(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)

With only a day to spend in Soller, we opted to walk down to the port instead, which took us on a less-direct, but no less picturesque, route through country lanes. Before we began our hike, however, we made sure to stop at Sa Fabrica de Gelats. They have an overwhelming amount of flavours, but the one to try is their orange juice sorbet, made from fresh-squeezed oranges.

(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)

The walk down to the Port de Soller took about 45 minutes. We followed a quiet road that led us past idyllic fincas, farmsteads living a new life as countryside bed-and-breakfasts, and groves of citrus fruit in full-bloom. Bees buzzed from blossom to blossom, and the lemons and oranges hung heavy on the boughs like too many Christmas ornaments.

(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)

The walk brought us almost directly to the waterfront of the town. (Fun fact: Port de Soller is centuries-old, having been victim to Moorish pirate raids in the 1500s. The village still celebrates their victory in one of these skirmishes every May.)

(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)

Nestled around a half-moon harbour sheltered by cliffs, Port de Soller has a broad promenade lined with shops and restaurants overlooking the town’s sandy beach and the water beyond. There are also plenty of beachfront bars to slake your thirst after a day of walking. Inevitably, most of the waterfront establishments cater to tourists, but if you approach it with that expectation, you can appreciate Port de Soller for its beautiful views and charming ambience. And really, is sitting back with a cocktail as you watch boats glide in and out of the harbour really so bad?

(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)
(photo credit: canuckrunningamuck)

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